Network Port Diagram for vSphere 6.0

VMWare finally released a “BIG PICTURE” network port diagram at their knowledge base site:

kb.vmware.com/kb/2131180

This is really a MUST HAVE if you are working in environments with security firewalls between the systems. So go and take it.

In older releases we had to work with this shitty table:

kb.vmware.com/kb/1012382

Thanks to VMWare and have fun with the diagram.

 

VPXA.wordpress.com goes VPXA.info

I finally migrated my blog from the public wordpress server to a private one.

One of the reasons for the migration was the possibilty to customize the website directly by editing the files. The second reason for the migration was the lower price for hosting than for the premium or business wordpress.com plans. They are to expensive for the features you recieve.

Thanks to wpbeginner.com for creating this useful post explaining how to migrate wordpress.com to wordpress.org. With this tutorial  it is really foolproofed and you can simply migrate it.

After the migration I added the Jetpack for WordPress and added a new design. I hope you like the new design.

In the next few days I will update the blog with new features and content. So please stay tuned!

Please use from now on the  new URL: http://vpxa.info

The old site will be deleted in the next few days

Install ESXi 6.0 on a DL380 G5 – yes it works

For a VMWare Horizon View POC in our environment we recieved an old HP DL380 G5 with nice specs: 2 phy. Quad-CPUs, 32GB RAM, RAID-Controller with write Cache, and quite everything redundant.

As SSDs are getting more and more beneficial, we bought 4 Kingston 300v SSD with 480GB of space and installed them in the OEM cases of the HP disks. Yes, this works!

For our tests this hardware is more than enough.

First of all I googled around to see if there was already someone who tried to install ESXi 6.0 on an old DL380 G5 as it isn’t a supported hardware. I’ve found this article from a guy that was having problems with the HP custom iso installing it on a G5 server:

http://htluo.blogspot.ch/2015/05/esxi-60-on-hp-dl380-g5.html

So I decided to have a try with the original ISO. After booting the Image I received an error message saying that I’m using unsupported hardware. Thank’s for the information but I know this already 😉 You can accept the information an run-through.

After the installation completed, I connected to the ESXi server with the VIClient. Everything looked well with the exception of the hardware. There was no hardware listed.

This is because the HP drivers are not integrated into the image. So I downloaded the needed VIBs from the HP VIB repository and installed them (the text in the brackets is not part of the command). For those who don’t know what a VIB is, have a look on this article:

Before I could install the VIBs I had to put the ESX server in maintenance mode:

If you receive a message like this, this is because there are VMs running on the system:

So I had to check what VMs are running on the system and stop them. You can do this with the VI Client or with the shell:

Now that we have the world id of the VM (similar to the PID), we can stop the VMs with those commands:

Retry now to run the enter maintenance mode command and check the state with this command:

The output should look similar to this:

As you can see, the ESX server is now in maintenance mode. So i could begin with the installation of the VIBs. For this I used the esxcli “software vib install”. It is important that you write the full path to the VIB file. Otherwise the command ends with an error:

The output should look similar to this:

As you can see in the message, the system requires a reboot after the installation. So we can now reboot the system with the reboot command.

After the reboot we can connect us with the VIClient to the esx server and now we should see all the hardware and sensors installed on the system:

ESX Hardware

So then, I wish you happy virtualizing with your new ESXi server and do not forget to configure the rest such as ntp, ssh, portgroups, vm settings and so on.

P.S. this server is running now about 4 weeks without any problems or PSOD

Getting all Snapshots with Powershell

Every vSphere Admin knows, that if you give someone in your organization the rights to take snapshots, you will lose the control of them.

Often they forget to delete the snapshot after their maintenance. So the snapshots gets bigger and bigger. The results are full datastores, big snapshots that can’t be no-more deleted and in the worst case you will have corrupted VM.

To counter against those problems, I’ve wrote a Powershell script that gets all snapshots in your environment and sends you an email with the name, size, time and the description of the snapshots.

You just have to edit the global variables with yours and then schedule the script.

After this, you can control your snapshots much more better.

Feel free to use, edit and share it: